Breaking Walls S01E04: The Future of The WallBreakers

 

www.gofundme.com/thewallbreakers

In this very special episode of Breaking Walls, we go over the many announcements from this past week:

 

Highlights

• The Feedback from James Scully’s Op-Ed “Why I Left NYC: The Future of The WallBreakers,” and a further explanation of the events that led him to write the piece.

• The announcement of S01E02 guest Lina Gonzalez as James’ new partner with The WallBreakers!

• The Future of The WallBreakers as a community and what kind of growth we can expect in 2015.

• Our plans for our site to be relaunched on 2/1/2015 as a full creative content hub

• Our GoFundMe campaign! – To donate go to www.gofundme.com/thewallbreakers

 

Looking to subscribe on iTunes? Open iTunes and search for “The Wall Breakers” and hit subscribe or go here - https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/the-wall-breakers/id924086880?mt=2 Read More

Artist Jess Riva Cooper’s Vision of the World

Artist Jess Riva Cooper’s Vision of the World

The following is a guest article by Mehreen Shahid, who you can connect with on Linkedin here!

 

Weeds and spores are growing out of women’s hair, eyes, ears and even mouths, as if a new species is being formed. They seem happy with it—or maybe it’s surprise and shock at being invaded by Mother Nature.

 

This isn’t a scene from a science-fiction movie. These are the works of Sheridan faculty member Jess Riva Cooper who is nominated for the 2014 RBC Emerging Artist People’s Choice Award. Read More

Typeface of the Week: Skia

Typeface of the Week: Skia

Skia is a humanist, sans serif typeface designed by world-renowned typographer Matthew Carter as a system font for Apple Computers in 1994. It’s history is rooted in ancient greek handwriting, and it’s name comes from the greek word for “shadow.” The font is also significant because it’s the only font Apple ever shipped with their operating system which made use of a TrueType variable axes system, thus making the font highly customizable in its formatting, which at the time was an unheard of feature. This was essentially a predecessor to OpenType formatting, which is common today. Read More