The 1st Ninja Turtles NES Game

The 1st Ninja Turtles NES Game

I still haven’t beaten this game! I’ve been playing it on and off for twenty-years and I can’t even get passed the third level. It’s borderline impossible. However, I still love it. First released as a 1989 platform game for the Nintendo Entertainment System, the game was developed by Konami and originally released in Japan through Konami themselves, then in North America through Konami’s Ultra Games imprint, followed by a release through the European equivalent, Palcom Software, in PAL regions.

 

The gameplay in Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles begins with an overhead view used for navigating around the mission map, switching to a side view whenever the Turtle being controlled enters a manhole or a building, similar to Castlevania and Zelda II: The Adventure of Link. Enemies can attack the player while exploring in the overhead view; Foot Soldiers, Roller Cars (effectively steam rollers), and in later missions, even aircraft can assault the player. However, the Turtle can strike back with his weapon or, in Mission 3, either missiles or cannon fire from the Party Wagon. Once inside a sewer or a building, the player encounters enemy characters such as Fire Freaks (beings of living fire), additional Foot Soldiers (who jump, kick, and throw shurikens), and Mousers. The player can also acquire weapons and special items, and collect pizza to restore health. A screen accessed with the Start button shows a summary of each Turtle’s health and whatever special weapon he has picked up, a map grid of the current area (not available inside Mission 6, the Technodrome), and messages from either Splinter or April O’Neil. A Turtle who runs out of health, falls into a fatal trap such as a fire pit, or is run over by a Roller Car, is not actually killed; instead, he is captured by the enemy, losing whatever special items he had acquired. Captured Turtles can be rescued starting in Mission 3, though only one Turtle can be freed per level.

 

Take a look at some of the gameplay below!

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Garfield’s 1st Week of Comics in 1978

Garfield’s 1st Week of Comics in 1978

I never really read comics as a kid, nor did I really read comics strips. Garfield was the only exception. I love Garfield. I’ve been collecting the books since childhood. I’ve read them all cover to cover several times. Even as recently as last year I ordered a few of the collections I didn’t already own on Amazon. It’s that serious! Perhaps it’s his unabashed love for lasagna that did me in? It could be that I too have always hated Mondays. More likely, it’s because beneath his sarcasm and cynicism he has always been portrayed as having a good heart. Garfield’s been around now for thirty-six years! That’s quite the run. Enjoy Jim Davis’ very 1st week of Garfield comics from June 19th – 25th, 1978. You can also read through every Garfield comic that’s ever been published in the archives of Garfield.com.

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The People of New York City in the 1960s, as Shot by James Jowers

The People of New York City in the 1960s, as Shot by James Jowers

Shot by James Jowers, these photographs show how New Yorkers lived and looked in the 1960s. As the George Eastman House (owners of Jowers’ photos) let us know, “Jowers, who was born in 1938, began to show interest in photography while serving in the United States Army where he was trained in darkroom procedures. In 1965 he became a student at the New School and studied under Lisette Model, who later became a close friend and mentor. At this time he was living on the Lower East Side and worked as a night porter at St. Luke’s Hospital; leaving him free to explore the City during the day and photograph life as he encountered it on the streets. Model later introduced Jowers to the Nancy Palmer Photo Agency where he was represented for several years.” 

 

A major constant in the work of New York School of photography artists like Jowers, Ruth Orkin, Saul Leiter, Ernst Haas , Ted Croner, Vivian Maier, and Esther Bubley was the emotion they captured on the faces and in the lives of the people living in New York at the time. So much of New York has always been feast or famine, and there’s a good chance that those who inhabit the Great City will at some point experience both. We New Yorkers have a hard time hiding the emotion on our faces, perhaps because, emotional privacy comes at more of a premium than most of us can afford. I don’t know that it’s necessarily different anywhere else in the world, but because New York is such a photographed city, those numerous moments in time have been captured and immortalized.



James Jowers donated the photographs and copyright to George Eastman House in 2007. The majority of the images were shot in New York City in the 1960s and early 1970s, an important and interesting time in US history. The photographs are of the New York City street photography genre. There are some remarkable images in this collection, including portraits of New Yorkers in various settings and anti-war protests in Central Park and elsewhere. There are also approximately 25 photographs of New Orleans in the 1970s. 

 

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