SKILLBUILDING / January 25, 2016 POSTED BY

Tips on How to Approach Tempting Potentially Bogus Work Offers

I once had an interesting conversation with illustrator and WallBreaker Barry Bruner that would have been alarming if I hadn’t seen the same thing happen on many other occasions. Barry and I discussed whether or not publicly telling the world about this would be the right thing to do. We agreed that it was.   Barry received an email from a campaign manager at Mike’s Hard Lemonade. The person claimed that he/she stumbled across some of

SKILLBUILDING / October 21, 2014 POSTED BY

Typeface of the Week: Skia

Skia_1

Skia is a humanist, sans serif typeface designed by world-renowned typographer Matthew Carter as a system font for Apple Computers in 1994. It’s history is rooted in ancient greek handwriting, and it’s name comes from the greek word for “shadow.” The font is also significant because it’s the only font Apple ever shipped with their operating system which made use of a TrueType variable axes system, thus making the font highly customizable in its formatting, which at

SKILLBUILDING / October 13, 2014 POSTED BY

Typeface of the Week: Didot

Didot

Didot has the distinction, along with Baskerville and Bodoni, as being one of the first truly “modern” typefaces. The extreme variations on the weights of the thick and thin portions within each letter made it quite unique. The exact version of Didot that we know today is based on a collection of related types developed in the period 1784–1811. Firmin Didot (1764–1836) cut the letters, and cast them as type in Paris. His brother, Pierre Didot (1760–1853) used the types

SKILLBUILDING / October 6, 2014 POSTED BY

Typeface of the Week: FF Meta

FF_META_1

FF Meta is a humanist sans-serif typeface family designed by Erik Spiekermann originally as a commission for the Deutsche Bundespost (West German Post Office), but later released by Spiekermann himself in 1991 through his FontFont library. According to Spiekermann, FF Meta was intended to be a “complete antithesis of Helvetica,” which he found “boring and bland.”   FF Meta has been adopted by numerous corporations and other organizations as a corporate typeface, for signage or in their logo. These include The Weather Channel, Herman Miller, Zimmer Holdings, and Fort Wayne International Airport.

SKILLBUILDING / September 29, 2014 POSTED BY

Typeface of the Week: Cheltenham

Cheltenham_1

Cheltenham is a display typeface, designed in 1896 by architect Bertram Goodhue and Ingalls Kimball, director of the Cheltenham Press. The original drawings were known as Boston Old Style and were made about 14″ high. These drawings were then turned over to Morris Fuller Bentonat American Type Founders (ATF) who developed it into a final design. Trial cuttings were made as early as 1899 but the face was not complete until 1902. The face was patented by Kimball in 1904. Later the basic face was

SKILLBUILDING / September 22, 2014 POSTED BY

Typeface of the Week: Clarendon

Clarendon_2

Clarendon is an English slab-serif typeface (slab serifs are also known as Egyptian fonts) that was created in England by Robert Besley for Thorowgood and Co. (or Thorowgood and Besley) in 1845. This type company was formerly known as the Fann Street Foundry until approximately 1838.  Clarendon has heavy, thick serifs, which gives the typeface a strong sense of weight. For those of you who are unfamiliar with typographic terms, a serif is a small line attached to the