#TBT 30 Perfectly Autumn Stock Photos

#TBT 30 Perfectly Autumn Stock Photos

Op-ed
A cold chill is in the air so you'd better grab your jacket. It's harvest season! It's time for costumes and apple-picking. It's time for pumpkin pie, cornucopias, and wool sweaters. It's time for shorter days and morning frost. It's time for trick-or-treating and thanksgiving meetings. It's time for 30 stock photos that perfectly exemplify Autumn in a way that'd bring a nostalgic tear to Martha Stewart's eye. I've always loved the colors of autumn, they're some of the richest that we incorporate into any season's visual vernacular. These images come to us courtesy of Offset. They're a great resource for designers searching for high-quality stock photography. (more…)
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Garfield’s 1st Week of Comics: 6.19 – 6.25.1978

Garfield’s 1st Week of Comics: 6.19 – 6.25.1978

Op-ed
I love Garfield. I've been collecting the chronological books of strips since childhood. It's that serious! Perhaps it's his unabashed love for lasagna that did me in? More likely, it's because beneath his sarcasm and cynicism he has always been portrayed as having a good heart. Garfield's been around now for thirty-eight years! That's quite the run. We've seen his likeness in movies, television shows, and even at the Macy's Thanskgiving Day Parade.   Jim Davis, Garfield's creator, grew up on a farm in Indiana. Jon Arbubkle's family background is taken almost directly from Jim's. While working in advertising in the late 1960s, he began assisting Tom Ryan's comic strip, Tumbleweeds. In between that time and the launch of Garfield, Davis spent five years working on a comic in The Pendleton Times, a local…
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The Oldest House in New York: The Pieter Claesen Wyckoff House, Built in 1652 in Brooklyn

The Oldest House in New York: The Pieter Claesen Wyckoff House, Built in 1652 in Brooklyn

Op-ed
For our Non-American readers, a house built in 1652 that's still standing might not seem like a big deal, but that the Pieter Claesen Wyckoff House, which was built in 1652 in Brooklyn, is still standing in a city where oftentimes buildings don't stand for more than forty years (let alone almost four-hundred) makes for a significant note in history.   According to the Historic House Trust of New York City, Pieter Claesen Wyckoff, an illiterate teenage farm laborer, arrived in the New Netherlands in 1637.  After serving his indenture to the Van Rensselaer family, he and his wife, Grietje van Nes, settled in the village of Nieuw Amersfoort, which later became the town of Flatlands. Wyckoff became a successful farmer and magistrate. Eventually Flatlands became part of the city of Brooklyn…
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Tracking Time: Camilo Jose Vergara’s Photos of NYC in the Early 1970s

Tracking Time: Camilo Jose Vergara’s Photos of NYC in the Early 1970s

Op-ed
Photographer Camilo Jose Vergara has been documenting life in urban American since the Nixon administration. As he says, "For more than four decades I have devoted myself to photographing and documenting the poorest and most segregated communities in urban America. I feel that a people’s past, including their accomplishments, aspirations and failures, are reflected less in the faces of those who live in these neighborhoods than in the material, built environment in which they move and modify over time. Photography for me is a tool for continuously asking questions, for understanding the spirit of a place, and, as I have discovered over time, for loving and appreciating cities."   These photographs are a candid look at New York City in the early 1970s. That version of New York was bankrupt. The Post World…
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Garry Winogrand’s Mid-Century Street Photographs Capturing a Time Gone By

Garry Winogrand’s Mid-Century Street Photographs Capturing a Time Gone By

Op-ed
In 2014 New York's Metropolitan Museum of Art showcased previously undeveloped rolls of film from Mid-century american street photographer Garry Winogrand. Winogrand was known for his portrayal of American life in the early 1960s. Many of his photographs depict social issues of the time. It shows the role of media in shaping attitudes. When Winogrand passed away, about 2,500 rolls of undeveloped film, 6,500 rolls of developed non-proofed exposures, and contact sheets made from about 3,000 rolls of his photography were discovered. The Garry Winogrand Archive at the Center for Creative Photography (CCP) comprises over 20,000 fine and work prints, 20,000 contact sheets, 100,000 negatives and 30,500 35 mm colour slides as well as a small group of Polaroid prints and several amateur motion picture films.   It was an absolutely wonderful exhibit that took you through New…
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