What’s the Significance of the Harvest Season?

What’s the Significance of the Harvest Season?

Op-ed
By definition, a harvest, in relation to farming, is the process of gathering mature crops from the fields. It's also where the term "reap" comes from. To reap is to cut the grain from the harvest, and it's also where the line "we reap what we sow" comes from. The harvest season marks the period between summer and autumn. All of us eventually reach a point where we're ready to harvest our own abilities into something larger than ourselves. Going through a period of this kind of growth tends to be difficult. Yet, on the other side of the difficulty is a time in which we're comfortable in our own skin. Learning to positively reap what we sow is a great thing. Autumn is a time for family and feasts. It's also a time for…
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Stopping Time: New York in One-Point Perspective

Stopping Time: New York in One-Point Perspective

Op-ed
Thanks to today's smartphone technology, most of us have a camera on our person at all times. The iPhone 7 shoots a maximum pixel depth in RAW of 3024 x 4032, or 10" x 13.5" at 300DPI. The camera has a 12MP rear-facing cameras with an aperture of ƒ/1.8. That's phenomenal quality for a phone. I'm also very excited about the new Light L16 camera coming out sometime next spring. It's set to revolutionize smaller cameras. The iPhone7 Plus contains a camera with duel 12MP rear-facing camera lenses. This Light L16 Camera uses a sixteen rear facing lens system to shoot photos at the same time, then computationally fuses them into a 52MP DSLR-quality image. It's quality unlike anything we've seen before in such a small camera. I can't wait to try it out!   The…
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50 Images of life in New York City from the Last Year

50 Images of life in New York City from the Last Year

Op-ed
New York City is such a wonderful place to photograph. I didn't fully appreciate its awesome energy until I left Brooklyn for the Arizona desert in September of 2014. That time away from the coastline made me realize how close of a relationship my life had with the waters surrounding New York. I also realized how wonderful a walking city New York is.   When I got back to New York, I began to photograph life much more frequently. As I did, my interest in and knowledge of the city's cultural history began to expand. There's history to be studied and appreciated at almost every turn on the streets of New York. Plus, with this much life interacting  it's guaranteed things will always be happening around us. People move here from every place in the…
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60 Iconic Norman Rockwell Saturday Evening Post Covers

60 Iconic Norman Rockwell Saturday Evening Post Covers

Op-ed
Much ink has been spilled here on The WallBreakers about Norman Rockwell. I've always felt that Rockwell beautifully captured an idealistic version of Americana in his paintings. We could absolutely argue that because he wasn't allowed to paint African Americans until his later years his version of Americana is mostly skewed. I try to put Rockwell's pre-1963 work in historical context based on who was commissioning him—The Saturday Evening Post—which only allowed white Americans to be depicted in their art in non-subjugational ways. After 1963, when Rockwell painted for Look Magazine, he was free to paint the kind of material that spoke to the social events of the day.   Rockwell was a master at using brush stroke, light, and color to communicate emotion. I remember visiting an exhibit at The Brooklyn Museum in which Rockwell's work was featured. To see…
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Quiet Please: The Thing on the Fourble Board – One of The Most Terrifying Radio Plays Ever

Quiet Please: The Thing on the Fourble Board – One of The Most Terrifying Radio Plays Ever

Op-ed
Quiet Please was an old-time radio horror/fantasy drama which ran from June 8, 1947 to June 20, 1949. It is considered by many (including myself) to be one of the most uniquely creative radio dramas in history. The show's creator, Wyllis Cooper, is also known for creating one of radio's most famous macabre masterpiece shows Lights Out. Ernest Chappell was the show's announcer and lead actor. Chappell played a different role each week, usually in a deadpanning manner which was brilliant for the shows constant sense of foreboding. That it was the same actor playing a different role each week is the kind of acting is akin to vaudevillian drama. American Horror Story does something similar.   I'm an old-time radio junkie, but you don't have to be one to appreciate this show and…
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