The Tree of 40 Fruits (Yes This is For Real)

The Tree of 40 Fruits (Yes This is For Real)

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    The tree of 40 fruit is a piece of art, a research project, and a form of conservation by contemporary artist and Syracuse University art professor Sam Van Aken. Aken has spent years taking different forms of stone fruit and grafting them into a single overarching species of tree. Now many exist. For much of the year, the trees look like just any other. Then, in spring, they bloom to reveal a gorgeous, diverse, striking bouquet of flowers. Over the course of the next several months, Van Aken's trees produce an incredible harvest of plums, peaches, apricots, nectarines, and almonds. Many of these fruits look like nothing we've commonly seen in markets, which are just the tip of the iceberg when it comes to varying fruit species. I remember when reading The Botany…
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Tips on How to Approach Tempting Potentially Bogus Work Offers

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I once had an interesting conversation with illustrator and WallBreaker Barry Bruner that would have been alarming if I hadn't seen the same thing happen on many other occasions. Barry and I discussed whether or not publicly telling the world about this would be the right thing to do. We agreed that it was.   Barry received an email from a campaign manager at Mike's Hard Lemonade. The person claimed that he/she stumbled across some of Barry's work and thought Barry might be interested in a project Mike's was in the process of calling entries towards. Mike's was looking for artists to create can artwork for a new flavor of  lemonade. The chosen artist's work was to be emblazoned on one of four limited edition cans, and would receive a $7.5K payoff for their work. On the…
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Typeface of the Week: Skia

Typeface of the Week: Skia

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Skia is a humanist, sans serif typeface designed by world-renowned typographer Matthew Carter as a system font for Apple Computers in 1994. It's history is rooted in ancient greek handwriting, and it's name comes from the greek word for "shadow." The font is also significant because it's the only font Apple ever shipped with their operating system which made use of a TrueType variable axes system, thus making the font highly customizable in its formatting, which at the time was an unheard of feature. This was essentially a predecessor to OpenType formatting, which is common today. (more…)
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Typeface of the Week: Didot

Typeface of the Week: Didot

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Didot has the distinction, along with Baskerville and Bodoni, as being one of the first truly "modern" typefaces. The extreme variations on the weights of the thick and thin portions within each letter made it quite unique. The exact version of Didot that we know today is based on a collection of related types developed in the period 1784–1811. Firmin Didot (1764–1836) cut the letters, and cast them as type in Paris. His brother, Pierre Didot (1760–1853) used the types in printing. His edition of La Henriade by Voltaire in 1818 is considered his masterwork. At times, the hairline strokes in Didot have been so thin that with early digital printing they had to be thickened through manipulation so that the font would print properly. In classifying Didot in a period of typography, it's described as neoclassical, and is evocative of the Age of…
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Typeface of the Week: FF Meta

Typeface of the Week: FF Meta

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FF Meta is a humanist sans-serif typeface family designed by Erik Spiekermann originally as a commission for the Deutsche Bundespost (West German Post Office), but later released by Spiekermann himself in 1991 through his FontFont library. According to Spiekermann, FF Meta was intended to be a “complete antithesis of Helvetica,” which he found “boring and bland.” (more…)
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